As a Charity and Not-For-Profit (NFP) you rely heavily on the goodwill and reputation of your organisation which could take years of effort and investment to build.  It is therefore crucial for you to protect your names and brands, and this can be achieved by way of trade mark protection.

A trade mark is a

Procurement decisions are made by charities and not-for-profits regularly and can be the source of problems and expense if you don’t get the decisions right.

It’s important that you don’t think that suppliers won’t look to enforce their agreement just because you are a charity or a Not-for–Profit association.

Procurement has its pitfalls and you

For charities that invite and rely upon donations from the public, their reputation and the public confidence in them is fundamental to their livelihood and success.  Bad press of any kind can lead to a significant reduction in donations, embarrassment for supporters of the charity, and may even invite investigation by regulatory bodies into the charity’s management.

A timely example of the impact of negative publicity can be seen in Sydney Morning Herald’s investigation into the Small Miracles Foundation.  The foundation in question provides grief counselling to parents that have lost their baby.

Risk to reputation can be managed by transparency, proper record-keeping and reporting and having proper staff management practices

The article reported:

  • allegations from a number of parties, including the charity’s accountant, alleging the charity’s “mismanagement” and refusal to give access to financial records;
  • allegations of unfair dismissals made by former staff; and
  • confusion as to who runs the charity and that detail of board members, management or staff are not available on the charity’s website.

Whether or not the allegations are correct, they are serious.  They have the real potential to drive away donors and result in further undesirable consequences.
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